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Bundaberg And Gin Gin Students Learn New Skills

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Teamwork and communication skills have been on show this week with around 20 Year 11 and 12 students from Bundaberg and Gin Gin high schools experiencing trade careers first hand as part of the ‘On the tools at Evolution” program, which wraps up on Thursay.  

Presented by the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy (QMEA) and Evolution Mining, trades people from the company’s Mount Rawdon operation have been mentoring students in a simulated work environment at Bundaberg State High School.

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Over the three days they have been building a model car from sheet steel using several trade skills.

“Evolution Mining is proud to partner with the QMEA and on these opportunities to provide this valuable hands-on experience to the students from the Bundaberg and Gin Gin state high schools,” said Evolution Mining’s Mount Rawdon’s People & Culture Manager, Penny Johnson.

“Even though technology pervades almost every occupation, including trades, it is one area where teamwork, communication and good hand skills are still required,” she said.

“We’ll be keeping an eye out for outstanding students who are interested in staying in the local communities and might wish to join our workforce in the next year or two.”

“Our students are very excited about this opportunity,” said Bundaberg State High School Principal Karen McCord.

“For the students to be able to talk directly with trades people and learn about the various trade occupations is invaluable,” she said.

“It’s also great for them to see how the theory they learn in the classroom can be related to every-day work.”

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The QMEA is a partnership between the Queensland Resources Council (QRC) and the Queensland Government under its Gateway to Industry Schools program. It has 60 schools throughout Queensland.

QRC is the peak representative body for Queensland ‘s resource sector. The Queensland resources sector provides one in every five dollars in the Queensland economy, sustains one in eight Queensland jobs, and supports more than 16,400 businesses across the state, all from 0.1 percent of Queensland’s land mass.